The MGTOW Meme

Inspired by my previous post.

Men Going Their Own Way Meme

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5 thoughts on “The MGTOW Meme

  1. Tarnished says:

    By the way, are you a MGTOW, Francis? I always assumed so but figured I should ask you personally.

    • Francis Roy says:

      I certainly am. Never been married, have always been hyper-careful about not getting anyone pregnant. In the old days they might have called me “a bachelor”, modern Internet days have donned me with an acronym.

      • Tarnished says:

        Hmm. I’m turning 30 this year, and have no boyfriend, husband, kids, or desires for such. Do you think I qualify for “spinster” status yet, or am I still a “bachelorette”? ;)

      • Francis Roy says:

        spinster (n.)
        mid-14c., “female spinner of thread,” from Middle English spinnen (see spin) + -stere, feminine suffix (see -ster). Unmarried women were supposed to occupy themselves with spinning, hence the word came to be “the legal designation in England of all unmarried women from a viscount’s daughter downward” [Century Dictionary] in documents from 1600s to early 1900s, and by 1719 the word was being used generically for “woman still unmarried and beyond the usual age for it.”

        Spinster, a terme, or an addition in our Common Law, onely added in Obligations, Euidences, and Writings, vnto maids vnmarried. [John Minsheu, “Ductor in Linguas,” 1617]

        Strictly in reference to those who spin, spinster also was used of both sexes (cf. webster, baxter, brewster) and so a double-feminine form emerged, spinstress “a female spinner” (1640s), which by 1716 also was being used for “maiden lady.” Related: Spinsterhood.
        http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=spinster

        These days, I’d be hard pressed to say that there’s a “usual age for marriage” in North American culture.

        bachelorette (n.)
        1935, American English, from bachelor with French ending -ette. Replaced earlier bachelor-girl (1895). Middle French had bachelette “young girl;” Modern French bachelière is found only in the “student” sense. [Think: “Bachelor’s degree” – F]
        http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=bachelorette

        The word single no longer has the meaning of “never married”, but now reflects a current relationship status. Depending on your motivations, you might adopt the political term of Woman Going Her Own Way.

        I’m more inclined to use the term “never married”.

        I feel like Star Trek’s Commander Data going on a ramble :)

      • Tarnished says:

        Wow, that’s a lot of info…thanks!

        I’m a little iffy about using WGTOW, since many MGTOWs are pursuing such a lifestyle due to unfair pressures/laws that really only affect cis males. I may think of myself as mentally male, but I’m not so detracted from reality to believe I face the exact same discriminations an actual man would in family/divorce court or in the case of a false rape/domestic violence report. There is no true movement for WGTOW precisely because it’s not truly necessary…closest you could get would be lesbian separatists.

        I am single because I’m happy living alone, enjoy my freedom, like having financial/personal accountability, and have no need for marriage. Even if I found my male “soul mate” tomorrow, I wouldn’t want to get married until this system is fixed and equal for both partners.

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